Wednesday, 16 March 2011 19:37

General Profile

Written By: McCann, Michael
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The metal smelting and refining industry processes metal ores and scrap metal to obtain pure metals. The metal working industries process metals in order to manufacture machine components, machinery, instruments and tools which are needed by other industries as well as by the other different sectors of the economy. Various types of metals and alloys are used as starting materials, including rolled stock (bars, strips, light sections, sheets or tubes) and drawn stock (bars, light sections, tubes or wire). Basic metal processing techniques include:

    • smelting and refining of metal ores and scrap
    • casting molten metals into a given shape (foundry)
    • hammering or pressing metals into the shape of a die (hot or cold forging)
    • welding and cutting sheet metal
    • sintering (compressing and heating materials in powder form, including one or more metals)
    • shaping metals on a lathe.

               

              A wide variety of techniques are used to finish metals, including grinding and polishing, abrasive blasting and many surface finishing and coating techniques (electroplating, galvanizing, heat treatment, anodizing, powder coating and so forth).

               

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              Contents

              Preface
              Part I. The Body
              Part II. Health Care
              Part III. Management & Policy
              Part IV. Tools and Approaches
              Part V. Psychosocial and Organizational Factors
              Part VI. General Hazards
              Part VII. The Environment
              Part VIII. Accidents and Safety Management
              Part IX. Chemicals
              Part X. Industries Based on Biological Resources
              Part XI. Industries Based on Natural Resources
              Part XII. Chemical Industries
              Part XIII. Manufacturing Industries
              Electrical Appliances and Equipment
              Metal Processing and Metal Working Industry
              Smelting and Refining Operations
              Metal Processing and Metal Working
              Microelectronics and Semiconductors
              Glass, Pottery and Related Materials
              Printing, Photography and Reproduction Industry
              Woodworking
              Part XIV. Textile and Apparel Industries
              Part XV. Transport Industries
              Part XVI. Construction
              Part XVII. Services and Trade
              Part XVIII. Guides

              Metal Processing and Metal Working Industry References

              Buonicore, AJ and WT Davis (eds.). 1992. Air Pollution Engineering Manual. New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold/Air and Waste Management Association.

              Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). 1995. Profile of the Nonferrous Metals Industry. EPA/310-R-95-010. Washington, DC: EPA.

              International Association for Research on Cancer (IARC). 1984. Monographs on the Evaluation of Carcinogenic Risks to Humans. Vol. 34. Lyon: IARC.

              Johnson A, CY Moira, L MacLean, E Atkins, A Dybunico, F Cheng, and D Enarson. 1985. Respiratory abnormalities amongst workers in iron and steel industry. Brit J Ind Med 42:94–100.

              Kronenberg RS, JC Levin, RF Dodson, JGN Garcia, and DE Griffith. 1991. Asbestos-related disease in employees of a steel mill and a glass bottle manufacturing plant. Ann NY Acad Sci 643:397–403.

              Landrigan, PJ, MG Cherniack, FA Lewis, LR Catlett, and RW Hornung. 1986. Silicosis in a grey iron foundry. The persistence of an ancient disease. Scand J Work Environ Health 12:32–39.

              National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). 1996. Criteria for a Recommended Standard: Occupational Exposures to Metalworking Fluids. Cincinatti, OH: NIOSH.

              Palheta, D and A Taylor. 1995. Mercury in environmental and biological samples from a gold mining area in the Amazon Region of Brazil. Science of the Total Environment 168:63-69.

              Thomas, PR and D Clarke. 1992 Vibration white finger and Dupuytren’s contracture: Are they related? Occup Med 42(3):155–158.